Quotes

Out the window

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “On the Way.”

No matter how many plane journeys have passed, looking out the window and being utterly and completely captured by the beauty of the skies is something that never loses its magic. Maybe it’s the Heavenly clouds, or the rainbow of colors, or the sun behind the clouds exuding the perfect glow, the beaming lights of the city below against the dark skies, maybe it’s the thought of defying gravity and nearing the stars, or simply the liberating feeling of being far removed from problems and concerns and being rapt in momentary peace. Whatever it is, this is an “on the way” moment that sure holds my gaze.

 April, 2015. Copyright © Sherley J. Edinbarough (Surely, Sherley and/or SurelySherley), 2015.
On the descend towards Houston, Texas.
April, 2015. Copyright © Sherley J. Edinbarough (Surely, Sherley and/or SurelySherley), 2015.
March, 2015. Copyright © Sherley J. Edinbarough (Surely, Sherley and/or SurelySherley), 2015.
Leaving the beautiful country of Costa Rica.
March, 2015. Copyright © Sherley J. Edinbarough (Surely, Sherley and/or SurelySherley), 2015.
 March, 2015. Copyright © Sherley J. Edinbarough (Surely, Sherley and/or SurelySherley), 2015.
Flying amongst the clouds.
March, 2015. Copyright © Sherley J. Edinbarough (Surely, Sherley and/or SurelySherley), 2015.

Thanks for visiting! Cheers!

Copyright © Sherley J. Edinbarough (Surely, Sherley and/or SurelySherley), 2015.

Violence, Violence

In response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: “Dear Leader.”

Today’s The Daily Post’s prompt, “Dear Leader”, states: If your government (local or national) accomplishes one thing this year, what would you like that to be?

My poetic response to that post deviates a bit and addresses not any government or nation in particular, but our collective humanity at-large. Thanks for reading, cheers!

Copyright: http://www.imagesbuddy.com/images/172/happy-world-peace-day.jpg
World Peace (© http://www.imagesbuddy.com)

Violence, Violence

Violence, Violence, you consume the soul,

Tainting it black, from which there’s no parole.

Every Life is a gift so profound,

Not to be snatched on a hunting ground.

Anger and Arrogance,

Bigotry and Ignorance,

Rancor and blood-thirst,

Ignite you with a kiss to exist.

But, Violence, Violence, your nature revealed,

A glutton who is never fulfilled.

How then to deem you ceased,

And tame this ravenous beast?

We lay sight onto what we share,

We lay sight onto the Humanity we bare.

We lay sight onto this world so vast,

Filled with beauty so unsurpassed.

We lay sight onto the soaring birds,

We lay sight onto the animal herds.

We lay sight onto this world so bountiful,

Other than which there’s nothing more powerful.

We lay sight onto the waters’ that surround,

We lay sight onto the ground that abound.

We lay sight onto the skies that shelter,

Nowhere else can we find something better.

We are but a speck with a brief flicker in time,

We will shine and commit no crime.

Radiate love and shun off hate,

We will mend and meld as one, to create a better fate.

Violence, Violence, your time is nearing an end,

We have been blind but it’s no more a trend,

With our sight we soon will acquiesce,

A world absent You, A world brimmed with Peace.

Surely, Sherley

Copyright © Sherley J. Edinbarough (Surely, Sherley and/or SurelySherley), May 30th, 2015.

Paradigm Shift

In response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: “180 Degrees.”

“180 Degrees: Tell us about a time you did a 180—changed your views on something, reversed a decision, or acted in a way you ordinarily don’t.”

Paradigm Shift

It was the year 2005. A moody Thursday in a border town located in South Texas. It was late in the afternoon. The clouds have covered the sky, dark and grey. Rain poured down, as though an entire ocean was being drained from above. Thunder rumbled in the sky, so deep and ominous. Brief flickers of lightening created a momentary ray, only to disappear right away.

In a silver Honda Accord, I sat in the back seat, entirely drenched by the rain, and with my backpack clinging on. With the wipers oscillating with such fierce swiftness, my father drove, calmly and slowly.

The road was barely visible, flooded by the heavy waters. With the hazard lights on, and the high beams burning bright, we moved—steady and strong.

Just then, a gray SUV zoomed past, splashing several feet of water on either side. The SUV so recklessly rushed past, on the opposite lane, in a hurry seemingly unneeded with such a monstrous weather. As the SUV shoved past, our car forcibly swayed to the right nearing the edge of the road, almost veering off into the ditch. Although our car trembled, my father, as skilled as he was, kept it on the road and we remained safe. The SUV merged onto our lane, in front of us, and kept the speed haste.

In shock we sat, wondering of what had happened. Unable to understand the irresponsible speed and reckless driving the SUV had displayed. We thought it to be a careless person, without consideration for another life. Surely it must be right, if they drove in such a reckless haste?

At a distance, a frail old woman, half deep in water, walked in a struggle, on the right side of our lane. The rain was pouring heavily upon her; she prodded along, with a hand full of bags, completely drenched. With the waters flooded heavily, her every step must be placed so precisely or she risks falling into the ditch, with the waters hiding the edge.

As we worriedly approached the frail woman closer and closer, the “reckless” SUV ahead, recessed its speed. With the hazard lights on, the SUV came to a complete stop. Its passenger side front door propped open right adjacent the frail woman. What was said between them remains unknown. But a gentle smile came upon the frail woman’s face, as she struggled to climb onto the seat.

As we passed the SUV, our rear-view mirror revealed a beautiful sight. The SUV that was in such a “reckless” rush, picked up the frail woman, and now turned around, driving off in the opposite direction. Seemingly, providing this woman with a ride and relief from the danger that surrounded.

It was a complete paradigm shift. Just moments before, we had thought of this person driving the SUV to be someone who was so inconsiderate of another life. Since, they drove so recklessly in this horrid weather, almost forcing us off to the ditch. But, that image changed completely as the person gave a ride to this frail old woman, driving off in the opposite direction, caring enough to take this woman to safety.

Our view of this person took a complete 180. Till this day, 10 years after, the kindness displayed by providing the old woman with safety is what is revered. It showed me that no one is either good or bad. No one is black or white. We are all but a collective shade, capable of making good choices, capable of showing kindness. I’d like to think that the person who drove the SUV, after almost forcing us off the road, reflected upon his or her haste, perhaps felt it was an unneeded momentary impulse. Perhaps it was one of those moments that changed his or her perspective of life, and forced him or her to slow down, and continue this journey without rush. Perhaps that is what compelled the once-rushing person to halt, offer a ride, and head off in the opposite direction. Or perhaps it’s nothing more than that he or she is simply, human. Capable of polar expressions. Capable of actions beyond reason. Capable of making their own 180s.

– Surely, Sherley

Thanks for visiting! Cheers!

Copyright © Sherley J. Edinbarough (Surely, Sherley and/or SurelySherley), 2015.

“Enveloped”

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Enveloped.”

Enveloped buds, awaiting a bloom. May, 2015. Brownsville, Texas, U.S.A. Copyright © Sherley J. Edinbarough (Surely, Sherley and/or SurelySherley), 2015.
Enveloped buds, awaiting a bloom.
May, 2015. Brownsville, Texas, U.S.A. Copyright © Sherley J. Edinbarough (Surely, Sherley and/or SurelySherley), 2015.

Draped with love,

Held tightly to nurture the life within,

In a hard casing that fits like a glove,

Although it appears to be thin.

Many a Moon passes, Sun scorches, Rain pours, Winds challenge,

Steadfast the bonds remain,

Bearing no damage,

In an envelope until life ruptures absent pain.

– Surely, Sherley

Thanks for visiting! Cheers!

Copyright © Sherley J. Edinbarough (Surely, Sherley and/or SurelySherley), 2015.

WP Photo Challenge: “Broken”

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Broken.”

Life knows no bounds.”

Back in September of 2014 I posted a picture of my driveway. It had a large crack in the pavement, with weeds growing from it. I believe this is a good example of “Broken” for this week’s challenge. Please check out, “Life knows no bounds” from last September. Thanks for visiting! All comments are welcomed. Cheers!

Copyright © Sherley J. Edinbarough (Surely, Sherley and/or SurelySherley), 2014. Grass growing between cracks in the cement pavement.
Copyright © Sherley J. Edinbarough (Surely, Sherley and/or SurelySherley), 2014.
Grass growing between cracks in the cement pavement.

Broken, yet a threshold for life.

The image of grass growing between the cracks in the cement pavement of my driveway got me thinking. What does it truly mean to “persist”, to “have tenacity”, to “survive”?

Most of us are used to seeing the image of certain plants protruding from our driveways, and we think, “there goes the smooth pavement!” Our instinct is to reach for a can of “Weed Killer’ and to spray the plants out of existence. Normally,  I too would do just that.

But today, it made me ponder of how even a large slab of cement is not a barrier for these plants. How beneath the layers, this one life can penetrate outwards, survive and thrive, making the pavement its own.

It made me realize, how often in life, we tend to be suppressed by boundaries. That too, self imposed, more often than not. How we let ourselves be limited, and refuse to challenge, outgrow, thrive. From the dawn of time, to “persist”, and to “have tenacity” IS to survive. Then why along the way do we sometimes choose to limit ourselves, to settle, to let rejections and “no’s” define us?

If this one plant can break through the hold of a barrier of cement and not only survive but thrive, then we too can break the holds and grow. Why linger on the “no’s” and rejections and negativity behind something not going as we had wished?

We can instead take a leaf from this plant’s book and choose to actively be the one who is in control of our own journey.

Keep persisting, be tenacious, and one day, we too can emerge from our barriers, and survive, nay, thrive, making our life, truly our own.

Because remember, “life knows no bounds.”

Surely, Sherley

Copyright © Sherley J. Edinbarough (Surely, Sherley and/or SurelySherley), 2014.

“The Zone”

In response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: “The Zone.”

May, 2015. Brownsville, Texas, U.S.A. Copyright © Sherley J. Edinbarough (Surely, Sherley and/or SurelySherley), 2015.
May, 2015. Brownsville, Texas, U.S.A. Copyright © Sherley J. Edinbarough (Surely, Sherley and/or SurelySherley), 2015.

An instance when I feel i’m in, “The Zone,” is during a run on a beautiful, Texan, summer day. Being kissed by the warmth of the sun, the cool breeze carrying the water from the resaca and brushing against my skin, the smell of freshly blooming jasmine flowers, the gentle gliding of colorful birds, the clear blue skies, the crispness in the air, my favorite songs joyfully filling my ears from the music player, the excited puppies in the yards wagging their tails upon my sight, the movement of my body feeling lighter with each step, the fruity taste upon my lips from my lip balm—makes me feel so in love with the moment. Not realizing I had been running for over two hours, my mind craved to keep going. I felt completely free. I felt completely at peace. It was my zone.

– Surely, Sherley

Copyright © Sherley J. Edinbarough (Surely, Sherley and/or SurelySherley), 2015.